The Cupolog

The northwest passage : Live without dead time

Monthly Report: Crossing the Equator, Changing Boots, Accelerating
querido amigo,
le comento que sigo con vida. en estos momentos con un  poco mas de  riesgo porqeu ayer vi una serpiente coral al lado de mi  carpa. y bueno,  yo tenia la ilusion de que sea una falsa coral pero no,  recien me fije  en la internee y era de verdad nomas. asique bueno. pero  si, estoy en  cordoba, en las sierras. esta genial. despues de un tiempo  largo de  andar dando vueltas por aqui y por alla llegue adonde queria  llegar.  mas verde de lo que me esperaba porque es una zona seca, peo se  ve que  por aca hay napas de agua bastante cerca porque hay mucho arbol.
vos por donde andas? cuando pisas suelo argentino? teng ganas de  verte y  de que unamos nuestras fuerzas para seguir recorriendo lugares   zarpados. la proxima vez que me conecte voy a poder escribir mas, pero   ahora se me esta yendo el sol y tengo que volver caminando.
abrazo y  suerte!
—————————————————————————————————————
Parcero,We’ve entered your side of the world. My boots became so worn and ragged, to the point where I was tripping over the loose rubber soles, that I had to leave them back in the Northern Hemisphere. From now on I’ll be using the spare boots I’ve had in my bag this entire time. Yes, throughout all of Central America, the Caribbean, and Colombia I’ve been carrying spare boots along with a jacket and winter clothes. It seemed silly at the time, but now I wish I had more. It’s freezing at night. Who would of thought the equator could be so cold? Right now, Ania and I are on our way to Quito. The altitude is about 3000 meters. It’s hard to breathe up here, especially when walking uphill, and as I’ve recently noticed, there are many “uphills” in the Andes.It’s good though. I’m happy to be moving south. Colombians were great people, many of them the best people I’ve ever met, but they ate too much sugar-butter-fried-fat. These things are hard on a traveler’s body. Their national breakfast is a fried ball of cheese. “Pandebono” they call it.First thing we did in Ecuador was order a quinoa soup to start flushing out the system.Being up here in the Andes, moving from one indigenous community to the other is bringing us back to our original intentions for the journey. It’s going to be an interesting ride from here to Bolivia. Your message put me in a good mood. I’m glad you want to continue south when we get to Buenos Aires - which, by the way, shouldn’t be too much longer from now. Ania decided she wants to finish her studies. She’ll be going back to school in the fall so we now have a time limit. As a result, we’re moving faster.
Expect us in May or June or July.
We’ll figure out the rest later.
El sol quema y el cielo es azul oscuro en las montañas,Diego

Monthly Report: Crossing the Equator, Changing Boots, Accelerating

querido amigo,

le comento que sigo con vida. en estos momentos con un poco mas de riesgo porqeu ayer vi una serpiente coral al lado de mi carpa. y bueno, yo tenia la ilusion de que sea una falsa coral pero no, recien me fije en la internee y era de verdad nomas. asique bueno. pero si, estoy en cordoba, en las sierras. esta genial. despues de un tiempo largo de andar dando vueltas por aqui y por alla llegue adonde queria llegar. mas verde de lo que me esperaba porque es una zona seca, peo se ve que por aca hay napas de agua bastante cerca porque hay mucho arbol.

vos por donde andas? cuando pisas suelo argentino? teng ganas de verte y de que unamos nuestras fuerzas para seguir recorriendo lugares zarpados. la proxima vez que me conecte voy a poder escribir mas, pero ahora se me esta yendo el sol y tengo que volver caminando.

abrazo y suerte!

—————————————————————————————————————

Parcero,

We’ve entered your side of the world.

My boots became so worn and ragged, to the point where I was tripping over the loose rubber soles, that I had to leave them back in the Northern Hemisphere.

From now on I’ll be using the spare boots I’ve had in my bag this entire time. Yes, throughout all of Central America, the Caribbean, and Colombia I’ve been carrying spare boots along with a jacket and winter clothes. It seemed silly at the time, but now I wish I had more.

It’s freezing at night. Who would of thought the equator could be so cold?

Right now, Ania and I are on our way to Quito. The altitude is about 3000 meters. It’s hard to breathe up here, especially when walking uphill, and as I’ve recently noticed, there are many “uphills” in the Andes.

It’s good though. I’m happy to be moving south. Colombians were great people, many of them the best people I’ve ever met, but they ate too much sugar-butter-fried-fat. These things are hard on a traveler’s body. Their national breakfast is a fried ball of cheese.

“Pandebono” they call it.

First thing we did in Ecuador was order a quinoa soup to start flushing out the system.

Being up here in the Andes, moving from one indigenous community to the other is bringing us back to our original intentions for the journey. It’s going to be an interesting ride from here to Bolivia.

Your message put me in a good mood. I’m glad you want to continue south when we get to Buenos Aires - which, by the way, shouldn’t be too much longer from now.

Ania decided she wants to finish her studies. She’ll be going back to school in the fall so we now have a time limit. As a result, we’re moving faster.

Expect us in May or June or July.

We’ll figure out the rest later.

El sol quema y el cielo es azul oscuro en las montañas,
Diego

  1. diegocupolo posted this