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The Cupolog

In north america to promote my first book

Eat The Rich
Napoli, Italia  - © Diego Cupolo 2013

Eat The Rich

Napoli, Italia - © Diego Cupolo 2013

First Time Painters
Reyhanlı, Turkey - © Diego Cupolo 2013

First Time Painters

Reyhanlı, Turkey - © Diego Cupolo 2013

Plaza Grande
Quito, Ecuador - © Diego Cupolo 2012

Plaza Grande

Quito, Ecuador - © Diego Cupolo 2012

Out on the lawn
Quito, Ecuador - © Diego Cupolo 2012

Out on the lawn

Quito, Ecuador - © Diego Cupolo 2012

Back in the city, Back in the poverty
Cali, Colombia - © Diego Cupolo 2012

Back in the city, Back in the poverty

Cali, Colombia - © Diego Cupolo 2012

Highrise Slumtropolis
Behind the luxury condos in Panama City’s richest neighborhood, under the highway along the ocean, stands a rusty slum on polluted waters where families swim between styrofoam cups and used tampons.
Panama’s economy is booming and so is its social inequality.
Panama City, Panama - © Diego Cupolo 2011

Highrise Slumtropolis

Behind the luxury condos in Panama City’s richest neighborhood, under the highway along the ocean, stands a rusty slum on polluted waters where families swim between styrofoam cups and used tampons.

Panama’s economy is booming and so is its social inequality.

Panama City, Panama - © Diego Cupolo 2011

"Poverty is the worst form of violence"
~ Gandhi
Puerto Limón, Costa Rica - © Diego Cupolo 2011

"Poverty is the worst form of violence"

~ Gandhi

Puerto Limón, Costa Rica - © Diego Cupolo 2011

English/Geography Class
Comunidad del Volcan, Nicaragua
© Diego Cupolo 2011

English/Geography Class

Comunidad del Volcan, Nicaragua

© Diego Cupolo 2011

Public Space
– Place de la Paix Picnic / 11:30 a.m. – 
Each day, throughout the Mutek festival, I was sent on a variety of photo assignments. In this picture, the promoters organized a picnic in a downtown plaza.
Business people, donors, neckties and black dresses.
Among them was a homeless Asian woman. She stood in front of the grill, watching plates of food get handed out. Most people ignored her. Another drifter. Then she sat down in the middle of their golf club conversations.
Eventually, someone gave her a sandwich and she went away.
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Public Space

– Place de la Paix Picnic / 11:30 a.m. –

Each day, throughout the Mutek festival, I was sent on a variety of photo assignments. In this picture, the promoters organized a picnic in a downtown plaza.

Business people, donors, neckties and black dresses.

Among them was a homeless Asian woman. She stood in front of the grill, watching plates of food get handed out. Most people ignored her. Another drifter. Then she sat down in the middle of their golf club conversations.

Eventually, someone gave her a sandwich and she went away.

© Diego Cupolo 2011

 
Things happened in the Spring V
The homeless kept begging in the streets. Some were unlucky, others liked it that way and the rest were schemers. There were many schemers in Montreal. The one above was unlucky, but thinks he’s a schemer.
 
Atwater Market - Montreal, Quebec
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Things happened in the Spring V

The homeless kept begging in the streets. Some were unlucky, others liked it that way and the rest were schemers. There were many schemers in Montreal. The one above was unlucky, but thinks he’s a schemer.

 

Atwater Market - Montreal, Quebec

© Diego Cupolo 2011

Albany Terminal
The bus station crowd is what happens when you boil the fat out of American society. The strange, the old, the people living without cars among tangled spaghetti highways. You don’t have to travel to Africa or Southeast Asia to see real poverty - just visit your local bus station.
Albany Bus Terminal - Albany, New York
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Albany Terminal

The bus station crowd is what happens when you boil the fat out of American society. The strange, the old, the people living without cars among tangled spaghetti highways. You don’t have to travel to Africa or Southeast Asia to see real poverty - just visit your local bus station.

Albany Bus Terminal - Albany, New York

© Diego Cupolo 2011

So Many Homeless in the Cold
 
Le Plateau Mont-Royal - Montreal, Quebec

© Diego Cupolo 2011

So Many Homeless in the Cold

Le Plateau Mont-Royal - Montreal, Quebec

© Diego Cupolo 2011

Brown Underground
In the Metro - Montreal, Quebec
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Brown Underground

In the Metro - Montreal, Quebec

© Diego Cupolo 2011

Day 27 - Part 1: Dear Julio
I stopped by the Mambo food store to get some fruit before going to the beach. They didn’t have any. When I walked out, I found an old Puerto Rican man yelling at an American tourist in a Harvard t-shirt. When the old man saw me he said, “Hey, Diego! You how you been? You need a ride?”
I had no idea who he was. He probably picked me up at one point or another. I hopped in his car and we drove towards Esperanza. His name was Julio.
“So what was all that about?” I asked.
“Huh? Oh, you mean what I was talking about with el tonto? It was nothing. That guy wished me a happy Three Kings Day, that’s all. I was telling him I don’t celebrate Three Kings Day,” Julio said.
“Why’s that?”
“Because you know what the Three Kings were? They were astrologists. You know what that means? It means they were associated with the devil, my friend. I don’t believe in that crap.”
“Aha.”
“Also, how is anyone going to tell me a virgin gave birth to baby Jesus? That don’t make no sense. Every one of us, you and me included, came from sex between a man and woman. Am I right? That’s why I don’t celebrate any of this stuff and I definitely can’t have stupid people wishing me a happy Three Kings Day,” he said. 
We talked for a bit and I learned Julio grew up in Vieques. He said he used to ride the wild horses to school every day. All his classmates did. They would simply find a horse along the way and jump on it.
“The horses let you do that?” I asked.
“Yeah, they were used to it,” he said. “They were semi-tamed, you know.”
“That’s great.”
“Yeah, that’s how it used to be. Life was easy. Now everything’s about money.”
“What do you mean?”
“Here, people used to live off the land,” he said waving his hand over the dashboard. “We got all our food from the ground. Papayas, bananas, you name it. People had their little farms and that was that. Sure, they didn’t have no money, but at least they could eat.”
He paused for a few seconds and seemed to collect his thoughts.
“Now, it’s all about property and who owns what. People have to have money to eat and there isn’t enough work.”
He looked over the fields we were passing.
“Did you know some Italian investor wanted to make this area a huge resort with a golf course and everything?” Julio said.
“No, but is there enough electricity on this island for those types of places to exist?”
“Exactly, my friend, exactly,” Julio said while slapping the steering wheel. “These people come in here with all the money in the world, trying to make luxury hotels and spas and all that junk, but don’t think about us or the island AT ALL. The people that live here keep getting poorer and poorer. We don’t see any of the money that gets invested in Vieques. We don’t even know where it goes. They just take away our land, build big walls around their resorts and then expect us to figure it out for ourselves.”
I got out at the Sun Bay entrance. I thanked Julio and started walking down the dirt road to Navio Beach.  
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Day 27 - Part 1: Dear Julio

I stopped by the Mambo food store to get some fruit before going to the beach. They didn’t have any. When I walked out, I found an old Puerto Rican man yelling at an American tourist in a Harvard t-shirt. When the old man saw me he said, “Hey, Diego! You how you been? You need a ride?”

I had no idea who he was. He probably picked me up at one point or another. I hopped in his car and we drove towards Esperanza. His name was Julio.

“So what was all that about?” I asked.

“Huh? Oh, you mean what I was talking about with el tonto? It was nothing. That guy wished me a happy Three Kings Day, that’s all. I was telling him I don’t celebrate Three Kings Day,” Julio said.

“Why’s that?”

“Because you know what the Three Kings were? They were astrologists. You know what that means? It means they were associated with the devil, my friend. I don’t believe in that crap.”

“Aha.”

“Also, how is anyone going to tell me a virgin gave birth to baby Jesus? That don’t make no sense. Every one of us, you and me included, came from sex between a man and woman. Am I right? That’s why I don’t celebrate any of this stuff and I definitely can’t have stupid people wishing me a happy Three Kings Day,” he said. 

We talked for a bit and I learned Julio grew up in Vieques. He said he used to ride the wild horses to school every day. All his classmates did. They would simply find a horse along the way and jump on it.

“The horses let you do that?” I asked.

“Yeah, they were used to it,” he said. “They were semi-tamed, you know.”

“That’s great.”

“Yeah, that’s how it used to be. Life was easy. Now everything’s about money.”

“What do you mean?”

“Here, people used to live off the land,” he said waving his hand over the dashboard. “We got all our food from the ground. Papayas, bananas, you name it. People had their little farms and that was that. Sure, they didn’t have no money, but at least they could eat.”

He paused for a few seconds and seemed to collect his thoughts.

“Now, it’s all about property and who owns what. People have to have money to eat and there isn’t enough work.”

He looked over the fields we were passing.

“Did you know some Italian investor wanted to make this area a huge resort with a golf course and everything?” Julio said.

“No, but is there enough electricity on this island for those types of places to exist?”

“Exactly, my friend, exactly,” Julio said while slapping the steering wheel. “These people come in here with all the money in the world, trying to make luxury hotels and spas and all that junk, but don’t think about us or the island AT ALL. The people that live here keep getting poorer and poorer. We don’t see any of the money that gets invested in Vieques. We don’t even know where it goes. They just take away our land, build big walls around their resorts and then expect us to figure it out for ourselves.”

I got out at the Sun Bay entrance. I thanked Julio and started walking down the dirt road to Navio Beach.  

© Diego Cupolo 2011