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The Cupolog

In north america to promote my first book

This Volcano Habit
From roads to education and health care, Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa has done a lot to improve his country, but Ania and I liked him for two main reasons:
1. He told the U.S. government that if it wanted to keep military bases in Ecuador, then Ecuador would have to open it’s own military base in Miami.
2. He made national parks free a few days after we entered Ecuador.
That said, Ania and I went on a hiking binge. We climbed every mountain and volcano on our path to Peru.It.Was.Beautiful.Slowly, our red and white blood cells calibrated to the Andes. Breathing became easier with each excursion. By the time we reached Volcán Chimborazo (6310 meters) we had grown accustomed to high altitude climbing.And it was good timing. Due to the equatorial bulge, Chimborazo’s peak is the farthest point from the center of the earth. Of course, we didn’t get there - we don’t have glacier equipment- but we got damn close. 5500 meters high and cold, cold, cold burning sun.
Volcán Chimborazo, Ecuador - © Diego Cupolo 2012

This Volcano Habit

From roads to education and health care, Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa has done a lot to improve his country, but Ania and I liked him for two main reasons:

1. He told the U.S. government that if it wanted to keep military bases in Ecuador, then Ecuador would have to open it’s own military base in Miami.

2. He made national parks free a few days after we entered Ecuador.

That said, Ania and I went on a hiking binge. We climbed every mountain and volcano on our path to Peru.

It.
Was.
Beautiful.

Slowly, our red and white blood cells calibrated to the Andes. Breathing became easier with each excursion. By the time we reached Volcán Chimborazo (6310 meters) we had grown accustomed to high altitude climbing.

And it was good timing. Due to the equatorial bulge, Chimborazo’s peak is the farthest point from the center of the earth.

Of course, we didn’t get there - we don’t have glacier equipment- but we got damn close.

5500 meters high and cold, cold, cold burning sun.

Volcán Chimborazo, Ecuador - © Diego Cupolo 2012

The Politician
Lago de San Pablo, Ecuador - © Diego Cupolo 2012

The Politician

Lago de San Pablo, Ecuador - © Diego Cupolo 2012

A Farewell to Arms
Adios Colombia. Adios Guerras.
¿Qué vas a ser cuando bajes las armas?
On the road, Colombia - © Diego Cupolo 2012

A Farewell to Arms

Adios Colombia. Adios Guerras.

¿Qué vas a ser cuando bajes las armas?

On the road, Colombia - © Diego Cupolo 2012

South Colombia Rush
We wanted to stop.
We wanted to know Southern Colombia.
We wanted to see areas of coca fumigation and devastated food crops.
We wanted to meet people that lived between - were forced to choose between - paramilitaries and guerrillas.
We wanted to understand the world’s second largest displaced population.
But we couldn’t. Not if we wanted to reach Tierra del Fuego.
So we moved on - to Ecuador - and told ourselves: maybe next time.
On the road, Colombia - © Diego Cupolo 2012

South Colombia Rush

We wanted to stop.

We wanted to know Southern Colombia.

We wanted to see areas of coca fumigation and devastated food crops.

We wanted to meet people that lived between - were forced to choose between - paramilitaries and guerrillas.

We wanted to understand the world’s second largest displaced population.

But we couldn’t. Not if we wanted to reach Tierra del Fuego.

So we moved on - to Ecuador - and told ourselves: maybe next time.

On the road, Colombia - © Diego Cupolo 2012

Elections Tomorrow
La Prensa, one of Nicaragua’s two major papers, rarely says something nice about Daniel Ortega.
Moyogapla - Isla de Ometepe, Nicaragua
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Elections Tomorrow

La Prensa, one of Nicaragua’s two major papers, rarely says something nice about Daniel Ortega.

Moyogapla - Isla de Ometepe, Nicaragua

© Diego Cupolo 2011

Back in the U.S.S.A
First thing I see is a homeless man with a pillow preaching about September 11th in the middle of a bus station.
"I’m not the problem, you’re all the problem," he said. "If you were paying attention before the first plane hit the tower you would’ve known it was coming."
He then raised his right hand in the air and rambled about flying houses and clergy men.
South Station, Boston
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Back in the U.S.S.A

First thing I see is a homeless man with a pillow preaching about September 11th in the middle of a bus station.

"I’m not the problem, you’re all the problem," he said. "If you were paying attention before the first plane hit the tower you would’ve known it was coming."

He then raised his right hand in the air and rambled about flying houses and clergy men.

South Station, Boston

© Diego Cupolo 2011

Capitalisn’t
When people talk about capitalism it’s a bit of a  joke. There’s no such thing. No country, no business class, has ever  been willing to subject itself to the free market, free market  discipline. Free markets are for others. Like, the Third World is the  Third World because they had free markets rammed down their throat.  Meanwhile, the enlightened states, England, the United States, others,  resorted to massive state intervention to protect private power, and  still do.
Virtually the entire dynamic economy in the United States is based  crucially on state initiative and intervention: computers, the internet,  telecommunication, automation, pharmaceutical, you just name it. Run  through it, and you find massive ripoffs of the public, meaning, a  system in which under one guise or another the public pays the costs and  takes the risks, and profit is privatized. That’s very remote from a  free market. Free market is like what India had to suffer for a couple  hundred years, and most of the rest of the Third World.
~ Noam Chomsky
Hochelaga, Montreal
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Capitalisn’t

When people talk about capitalism it’s a bit of a joke. There’s no such thing. No country, no business class, has ever been willing to subject itself to the free market, free market discipline. Free markets are for others. Like, the Third World is the Third World because they had free markets rammed down their throat. Meanwhile, the enlightened states, England, the United States, others, resorted to massive state intervention to protect private power, and still do.

Virtually the entire dynamic economy in the United States is based crucially on state initiative and intervention: computers, the internet, telecommunication, automation, pharmaceutical, you just name it. Run through it, and you find massive ripoffs of the public, meaning, a system in which under one guise or another the public pays the costs and takes the risks, and profit is privatized. That’s very remote from a free market. Free market is like what India had to suffer for a couple hundred years, and most of the rest of the Third World.

~ Noam Chomsky

Hochelaga, Montreal

© Diego Cupolo 2011

Canadian troops leave Afghanistan
Nice.
Now about that budget down south …
© Diego Cupolo 2011

Canadian troops leave Afghanistan

Nice.

Now about that budget down south …

© Diego Cupolo 2011

The Re-Election “Bush’s Puppy Dog”
Politics are more enjoyable from afar. They’re almost amusing when they don’t impact your life. 
This is true when following the silly U.S. budget debates from abroad, and also true when witnessing elections in a foreign country. 
Last week, Canada held special federal elections because Stephen Harper’s government was found in contempt. The result: voters re-elected Harper and gave his conservative party the majority.
The sound of palms smacking against foreheads was heard throughout Quebec.
Some people cried. 
Locals call Harper “Bush’s puppy dog” and judging by his stubborn deregulation policies, I would agree, only Harper looks about ten times dumber than Bush.
Voters in Quebec wanted to stop his re-election so badly they voted against their local party, the Bloc Québécois, and went with the NDP because they had a better chance of defeating Harper. 
The outcome was tragic. Harper won anyway and the Québécois have less representation at the federal level.
I asked a friend if the election results would reignite the seperatist movement in Quebec.
"I hope so, it’s clear that Quebec wants something different than the rest of Canada," she said. "If Quebec doesn’t separate in the next five years, we will never separate."
For now, it seems the idiot president is the way to go in 21st century politics. Harper will join Berlusconi, Sarkozy and Bush in the gradual de-evolution of Western society. Their damage is deep and widespread, but not necessarily permanent. 
If this is what the public needs to wake up, so be it.
© Diego Cupolo 2011

The Re-Election “Bush’s Puppy Dog”

Politics are more enjoyable from afar. They’re almost amusing when they don’t impact your life. 

This is true when following the silly U.S. budget debates from abroad, and also true when witnessing elections in a foreign country. 

Last week, Canada held special federal elections because Stephen Harper’s government was found in contempt. The result: voters re-elected Harper and gave his conservative party the majority.

The sound of palms smacking against foreheads was heard throughout Quebec.

Some people cried. 

Locals call Harper “Bush’s puppy dog” and judging by his stubborn deregulation policies, I would agree, only Harper looks about ten times dumber than Bush.

Voters in Quebec wanted to stop his re-election so badly they voted against their local party, the Bloc Québécois, and went with the NDP because they had a better chance of defeating Harper. 

The outcome was tragic. Harper won anyway and the Québécois have less representation at the federal level.

I asked a friend if the election results would reignite the seperatist movement in Quebec.

"I hope so, it’s clear that Quebec wants something different than the rest of Canada," she said. "If Quebec doesn’t separate in the next five years, we will never separate."

For now, it seems the idiot president is the way to go in 21st century politics. Harper will join Berlusconi, Sarkozy and Bush in the gradual de-evolution of Western society. Their damage is deep and widespread, but not necessarily permanent. 

If this is what the public needs to wake up, so be it.

© Diego Cupolo 2011

A Longer Temporary and the Value of Patience
It wasn’t supposed to be like this.
I was supposed to go south.
I vowed to escape the winter.
Instead, the winds pushed me to Montreal and every sign was screaming: “Stay for a while you dirty bastard!” 
I thought it over as I brushed my teeth. I was getting ready for an interview at the bakery. All I had to do was show up and I would get the gig.
Easy money.
Minimal responsibility.
Something to do while I exhibited my photos at a local yoga studio.
Yeah, the show would require some work, but not much. It was a solo show. Twenty-three large prints from Latin America. This is what happens when you cook for the right people.
And then, there was the apartment. Claudia suggested I move in.
Montreal, frigid in her soggy wool socks, was making an offer I couldn’t refuse. My stay remained temporary, but a longer temporary.
With settling down, came the necessity of stuff. Bare necessities. Sleeping on the floor would no longer suffice.
I didn’t have much, but it didn’t matter.
Patience is more important than money.
If you wait, the things you need will find you.
Psychology-based marketing has trained us to buy endless amounts of shit. Surely, this maximizes profits, but it also creates a culture of waste. People throw away everything …
… used once, used twice … never used.
Through patience I acquired a nice scarf, winter boots, a bike, a small dresser that also serves as a desk, a chair, and even a bed.
What else do you need?
Not all these things came from the streets. I simply asked around and people had extra stuff they didn’t use. Stuff they were happy to part with.
So began my life in Montreal. A life of recycling, efficiency and maximized economy.
Think voting is your strength?
No, voting just gives us the illusion we have control.
Your power is in your money. Keep it.
Starve the beast.
© Diego Cupolo 2011

A Longer Temporary and the Value of Patience

It wasn’t supposed to be like this.

I was supposed to go south.

I vowed to escape the winter.

Instead, the winds pushed me to Montreal and every sign was screaming: “Stay for a while you dirty bastard!” 

I thought it over as I brushed my teeth. I was getting ready for an interview at the bakery. All I had to do was show up and I would get the gig.

Easy money.

Minimal responsibility.

Something to do while I exhibited my photos at a local yoga studio.

Yeah, the show would require some work, but not much. It was a solo show. Twenty-three large prints from Latin America. This is what happens when you cook for the right people.

And then, there was the apartment. Claudia suggested I move in.

Montreal, frigid in her soggy wool socks, was making an offer I couldn’t refuse. My stay remained temporary, but a longer temporary.

With settling down, came the necessity of stuff. Bare necessities. Sleeping on the floor would no longer suffice.

I didn’t have much, but it didn’t matter.

Patience is more important than money.

If you wait, the things you need will find you.

Psychology-based marketing has trained us to buy endless amounts of shit. Surely, this maximizes profits, but it also creates a culture of waste. People throw away everything …

… used once, used twice … never used.

Through patience I acquired a nice scarf, winter boots, a bike, a small dresser that also serves as a desk, a chair, and even a bed.

What else do you need?

Not all these things came from the streets. I simply asked around and people had extra stuff they didn’t use. Stuff they were happy to part with.

So began my life in Montreal. A life of recycling, efficiency and maximized economy.

Think voting is your strength?

No, voting just gives us the illusion we have control.

Your power is in your money. Keep it.

Starve the beast.

© Diego Cupolo 2011